A must read!!

Oral health: an important piece of your overall health

Research shows there is a relationship between oral disease and other health problems such as diabetes and certain kinds of pneumonia. There may even be a link between oral diseases and heart disease and stroke, as well as premature and low birth-weight babies.

As part of a healthy lifestyle, practice good oral hygiene and have your mouth examined regularly by your dentist. Only your dentist has the training, skill and expertise to identify and address your oral health needs.

If you do not have a dental plan and cannot afford to pay your entire bill at once, ask your dentist about a payment plan. If you cannot afford care, even with a payment plan, contact your nearest social services agency, provincial or territorial dental association or dental school. So put a smile in your body and follow up.

Five steps to good oral health

Put a smile in your body. Follow these simple steps to good oral health and watch your overall health improve, too:

  1. See your dentist regularly
  2. Keep your mouth clean
  3. Eat a well-balanced diet
  4. Check your mouth regularly for signs of gum disease and oral cancer
  5. Avoid all tobacco products

Remember there is a connection between good oral health and overall health. April is National Oral Health MonthTM so talk to your dentist about the reasons why.

Put a smile in your body: visit your dentist

Our mouths are part of our bodies, not something separate. So it makes sense to care for our mouths the way we care for our bodies. Not only will our bodies thank us, the health care system will as well.

Research shows there is a connection between our oral health and our overall health. The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) says there is a relationship between oral disease and health problems such as diabetes and certain kinds of pneumonia. The CDA says there may even be a link to heart disease and stroke, as well as premature and low birth-weight babies.

The more we care for our mouths, the less chance we have of burdening the health care system. It only makes sense.

Choose the seal on oral care products

From toothbrushes to mouthwashes, oral care products bearing the Canadian Dental Association (CDA) Seal of Recognition have been reviewed by the CDA and have demonstrated specific oral health benefits.

For a list of oral health products recognized by the CDA, visit www.cda-adc.ca.

More Canadians suffering from dental erosion

Canadian dentists are seeing more and more patients with dental erosion. Dental erosion occurs when the hard part of the tooth wears away from direct contact with acid. Dental erosion can be caused by certain health conditions such as stomach acid problems and eating disorders, but eating and drinking foods high in acid such as sport drinks and soft drinks can also cause teeth to erode.

Three steps to preventing dental erosion

  • Choose drinks that are low in acid. Carbonated soft drinks are high in acid, which can harm your teeth
  • Do not swish or hold high acid drinks in your mouth for long periods of time or suck on citrus fruits
  • It is best to consume foods and drinks high in acid at the end of mealtime while there is still plenty of saliva in your mouth to wash away sugars and acids

Get snack smart with your kids

  • Limit the number of times a day your child eats or drinks sugars
  • Avoid sugary treats that stay in the mouth for a long time like hard candy or lollipops
  • Avoid soft, sticky sweets that get stuck in your child’s teeth
  • Serve sweets for dessert while there is still plenty of saliva in your child’s mouth to wash away the sugars
  • Serve juice and milk during or at the end of mealtime. Drink water between meals
  • Serve vegetables, cheese, nuts or seeds for snacks
  • Have your child brush her teeth at least twice a day and before going to bed

As part of a healthy lifestyle, practice good oral hygiene and have your mouth examined regularly by your dentist. Only your dentist has the training, skill and expertise to identify and address your oral health needs.

To learn more about your child’s oral health, talk to your child’s dentist and visit the Canadian Dental Association website at www.cda-adc.ca.

Comments are closed.